WWE Lays the Smackdown With 24/7 Network Launching in February

WWE Network

WWE fans, never worry about missing another big match or paying outrageous PPV rates again.  WWE has gone and done what we’ve all been waiting for.  They’ve gone around the the cable and satellite providers and networks and created their own online, streaming channel almost anyone can afford. [Read more...]

We “Like” 2.7 Billion Things on Facebook Each Day

Sometimes I think I have a lot of data to keep up with at home.  I take lots of photos and video for both personal and professional use.  With roughly 20TB of hard drives around my house, I feel like it’s getting out of control.  Then I read this.

Facebook takes in 500+TB of new data every freaking day.  We “Like” all kinds of crap on Facebook to the tune of 2.7 billion times per day.  And my little 20TB of data at home is nothing to Facebook’s 100 petabyte warehouse data center.

[via TechCrunch]

Splitflix.com Business Model is a Crime in Tennessee

Splitflix

Tennessee residents should avoid signing up for Splitfix, which is a new touted as a new way to save money by sharing Netflix and Hulu passwords amongst users – thereby “splitting” the cost.

In 2011, Tennessee legislators made it a crime to share passwords of online subscription services like Netflix and Hulu.  As a result, the entire business model of Splitflix is a criminal model in Tennessee, which could possibly be subject to classification as a criminal enterprise under RICO statutes were such a business formed in Tennessee.  It’s not, and there’s likely no way to for Tennessee to reach the activities of the business itself.

However, Splitfix.com customers who reside in Tennessee are almost certainly in violation of TCA 39-14-104, which criminalizes “Theft of services.”  As noted above, in 2011, the Tennessee legislature amended the definition of services to include “entertainment subscription services” and thereby criminalized Netflix password sharing.

All that said, Splitflix.com is a dumb idea.  Easily the dumbest start-up of the year.

Moreover, Splitflix just smells wrong – amiright?  Even if it’s not a crime or if it doesn’t already violate the terms of service for Netflix and Hulu (which I think it probably does), it just seems a little evil to try to take advantage of another business by undercutting their customer base for your own profit.  How about coming up with a better/alternative solution that’s actually competitive instead?

My prediction: Splitfix will die soon. Netflix and Hulu will make appropriate modifications to their Terms of Service and, if needed, will force Splitflix into submission.

Sony Press Conference at CES 2012

Monday night the Sony press conference was pretty spectacular.  Once the new products and services was talked up, Sony played the MIB3 trailer in 3D and then Will Smith came on stage briefly (cool stuff) and I was on the front row.  A few moments later Kelly Clarkson made a appearance and sang.

Back to the tech after the jump… [Read more...]

Happy New Year Comcast: Self-Throttling My Cable Bandwidth Usage

Every month I find myself trying to keep it under the 250GB Comcast bandwidth cap and I end up having to throttle my own bandwidth consumption.  If I go over, I run the risk of having my service cancelled.  It happens.

Comcast Bandwidth Cap

I don’t use P2P services – with the exception of the occasional download of a legal torrent from someone who has posted their work online to share with others.  Those make up less than a couple GB per month though.

I use the Internet to upload photos and videos to SmugMug, Flickr, Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube and so on.  I also consume almost all of my video entertainment from the Internet via Netflix streaming, YouTube or Vimeo. I backup my personal files to a cloud service.  And I think all of this is pretty normal and legal Internet usage.

And it’s only going to get more normal. [Read more...]

Infographic: Stats on World’s Fastest Internet Speeds

Global Download Study

via chartsbin.com

Pando Networks (see press release) recently published data on world wide internet speeds, by country and by city.  The data was collected between January and June of 2011, via 27 million downloads from 20 million computers in 224 countries.   I’m pretty sure you’ll be surprised by the countries listed in the top five, and check out how the superpowers like the U.S. and China fared.

Check out the informative infographic (was that redundant?) after the break, including access to an interactive version of the map as well.

[Read more...]